What suspense movies are good to watch on Netflix?

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Stuck for something to watch? Check out these thriller and suspense movies currently streaming on Netflix.

This is a live list, so you may want to bookmark this page to check again. The titles below are currently available on Netflix UK, but may vary locally.

Films on Netflix

► Calibre (2018)

Psychological Thriller

Life-long pals Vaughn and Marcus head into the remote Scottish highlands for a hunting trip. Then an accident – and rash decisions – turns the weekend into a claustrophobic nightmare.

This lean British thriller asks big questions about morality, and is almost unbearably tense at times. Not a cheerful film, or one you’ll likely want to watch again any time soon, but powerful, memorable and very foreboding.

Contains gore, violence and upsetting scenes.

► The Gift (2015)

Thriller

Grieving couple Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall relocate to a stylish new home in California for a fresh start. Then they bump into an old school acquaintance – but is he as welcoming as he appears?

Slightly over-rated but workable suspense movie, though a poor deal for the film’s female lead.

► Searching (2018)

Thriller

When John Cho’s 16-year-old daughter goes missing, he won’t rest until he brings her home or finds her body. Unfortunately, what he learns along the way – a ton of secrets – isn’t easy to live with, either.

This concept movie – told entirely through computer and phone screens – won’t be to everyone’s taste. Still, this is a better-than-average take on the missing person genre, with a decent twist and a satisfying ending.

► Prisoners (2013)

Crime, Mystery, Drama

Hugh Jackman plays a father driven to horrific acts of vigilantism when his daughter goes missing. Paul Dano is the disturbed young man accused of taking her, while Jake Gyllenhaal’s Detective Loki tries to figure out which of them to believe.

Taut blend of drama, thriller and crime genres, high on emotion and moral ambiguity. Above average story and performances.

► Infernal Affairs (2002)

Crime, Thriller

An undercover cop joins a criminal gang, just as a gang member infiltrates the police force. Both must reveal the identity of the other before being discovered – but the real danger is in convincing others that they are who they say they are.

Later remade as The Departed, but both films are exceptional. The plot is memorable for a shock twist, but captivating for its take on betrayal and corruption.

► Misery (1990)

Horror, Thriller

James Caan plays a successful writer who crashes his car in the middle of nowhere. Then he’s rescued by an eccentric nurse (Kathy Bates) and suddenly the car crash doesn’t seem so bad …

Based on a Stephen King novel, with an Oscar-winning performance by Kathy Bates and moments of nerve-shredding tension.

► I See You (2019)

Thriller

Cop Jon Tenney is hunting a serial killer who preys on young boys, but has problems of his own. Now he’s juggling a murderer, an unfaithful wife (Helen Hunt), and something creepy happening at home.

Smart, modern thriller which successfully blends multiple genres and plots, and manages to keep its twist off-radar until needed.

► 1922 (2017)

Horror

Farmer Thomas Jane plans to murder wife Molly Parker, and wants his son to help. But then he has to live with some gruesome consequences.

Based on a Stephen King short story, 1922 is lush to look at but lacks the depth, twists and tension of Misery. Avoid the trailer, which reveals almost the entire story.

► Inheritance (2020)

Thriller

When Lily Collins’ millionaire father (Patrick Warburton) dies, the only thing he leaves her is a run-down bunker at the bottom of the garden. Then she discovers what the bunker conceals.

Not as ingenious or deep-minded as it seems to take itself but entertaining enough. Simon Pegg plays very much against type – worth watching for that, too.

What’s not on the list?

The Frozen Ground (2013)

Nicholas Cage, John Cusack. A serial killer tortures sex workers, then hunts them and dumps their bodies in the wild. As bleak as it sounds, and not enough to make the story captivating.

Taking Lives (2004)

Angelina Jolie, Ethan Hawke. Big names – including Kiefer Sutherland – can’t save this serial killer thriller. The opening scenes (with Paul Dano) are a high point, but this oddly written story has big problems. The last half is bonkers.

Disturbia (2007)

Shia LaBoeuf, Carrie-Anne Moss. Teen reboot of Hitchcock’s Rear Window, which is it’s main problem. Grief and growing pains are done well, but the film introduces then forgets about its psycho killer for too long. The voyeurism jokes just seem kinda weird in the current climate.


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Picture credit: Corina Rainer